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Speech Writing Class 11, 12, Topics, Examples, Format

Speech writing involves employing appropriate language and expression to communicate with the reader. Speech writing is not all that different from other narrative writing styles. However, this writing form involves incorporating best-suited phrases and words to convey and connect to your audience. There are specific punctuation and writing style strategies that pupils should be aware of while writing a good speech. Even though it may be difficult to write the perfect speech, using the right speech writing framework can guarantee that you never fail.

Speech Writing Class 11

Speech writing is an important skill, especially for students in Class 11,12, as it helps in developing their ability to express thoughts coherently and persuasively. Speech is a means of spreading a message to other people. Popular leaders of the world in all domains connect with the masses through this speech. So, it is very important for speech writers to be excellent in their job. Excellent speech encompasses those words and emotions that help connect people across the spectrum. Writing a speech means expressing your opinions on a subject or demonstrating your vehement opposition to a particular notion. You need a powerful, authoritative voice to give a speech that is effective, but what you say is more crucial than how you sound. The preparation of a speech writing is just as important as the delivery of the speech to your audience.

Speech Writing Class 12

Speech Writing is very important topic for class 12. Here is a guideline for writing an effective speech:

Speech Writing Title: “The Importance of Embracing Change”

Introduction

  • Greeting: “Good morning everyone,”
  • Purpose: “Today, I want to talk about a constant in all our lives – change.”
  • Hook: “Imagine a world where everything remains static – no growth, no progress, just a monotonous continuity. Hard to envision, right?”

Body

  1. Define Change:
    • “Change is the law of life, impacting our personal and professional spheres. It’s inevitable and essential for growth.”
  2. Personal Anecdote or Example:
    • Share a personal story or historical example illustrating the positive impact of change.
    • “Consider the technological advancements over the last decade, transforming how we communicate and access information.”
  3. Benefits of Embracing Change:
    • “Embracing change opens up opportunities for learning and innovation. It fosters adaptability, a critical skill in today’s fast-paced world.”
    • “Change challenges our comfort zones, pushing us to explore new horizons and perspectives.”
  4. Counter Perspective:
    • Address common fears or resistance to change.
    • “It’s natural to fear the unknown. Change can be uncomfortable, but it’s also a catalyst for personal development.”
  5. Call to Action:
    • Encourage the audience to be open to change in their lives.
    • “Let’s welcome change, not as a disruption, but as a path to new opportunities.”

Conclusion

  • Summarize Key Points: Recap the importance of change and its impact.
  • Closing Remark: “In the words of Mahatma Gandhi, ‘Be the change you wish to see in the world.’ Let’s be agents of positive change, starting today.”
  • Thank You: “Thank you for your attention, and let’s embrace the journey of change together.”

Tips for Speech Writing:

  1. Clarity: Ensure your speech has a clear structure and message.
  2. Engagement: Use anecdotes, questions, or quotes to engage the audience.
  3. Persuasive Elements: Use facts, statistics, or examples to support your points.
  4. Language: Keep the language appropriate for the audience and occasion.
  5. Practice: Rehearse your speech to maintain a good flow and confidence.

Remember, a good speech is not just about delivering information, but also about connecting with the audience and leaving a lasting impact.

Speech Writing Format

The speech writing format is as follows:

  • Introduction: Introduce the topic and introduce yourself before introducing the audience.
  • Body: Detailed presentation of the subject, outlining salient points, potential advantages, and disadvantages, and so forth.
  • Conclusion: Summarize your speech, bring it to a close, and give your audience something compelling to ponder.

Let’s take a closer look at each component of the speech writing format.

Speech Writing Format: Introduction

The introduction ought to grab your attention after the greetings. Get everyone’s attention right away. Engaging the audience and persuading them to believe or act in your favour are the two main objectives of a speech. Effective introductions must contain the following:

  • A brief summary of your subject.
  • Define your speech’s general structure. (For instance, I’ll discuss First..Second..Third.)

Start off by making a statement about the room or a tale, quotation, fact, or joke. It shouldn’t go past three or four lines. (For instance, “Mahatma Gandhi once stated…” or “This subject makes me think of a certain occurrence or tale…”)
This section is crucial since it’s at this point that your audience will determine whether or not to pay attention to your speech. Maintain a factual, captivating, and persuasive introduction.

Speech Writing Format: Body

It is the most crucial section of every speech. If you want to persuade the audience to agree with you, you should offer a variety of justifications and arguments.

A crucial part of speech writing is handling objections. A speech is a monologue, thus there is no time for queries or concerns. An effective speech will handle any issues that may arise during it. As a result, you’ll be prepared to react to queries that the audience may have. You can organize the information into a flow chart to make speaking easier.

Speech Writing Format: Conclusion

The finish ought to leave the audience with something. It might serve as a reminder, a rallying cry, a synopsis of your speech, or a narrative. As an illustration, “It is up to us to decide the future of our planet, our home, by starting waste management at our personal areas.”

Add a few sentences thanking the audience for their time after you’ve finished.

For instance, “Thank you for being such a great audience and for your time. I hope you learned anything from this speech.

Speech Writing Examples

One of Martin Luther King Jr.’s most well-known speeches is “I Have A Dream.” Its effects have persisted for many generations. Using the aforementioned strategies, the speech is written. Here are a few instances:

“still cruelly bound by the chains of racism and the manacles of segregation” emotional Language

In a way, we’ve travelled to the capital of our country to cash a check. – Making the speech more unique

A call to action: “to stand up for freedom together.”

This is an important illustration of how to write a speech with the audience in mind. The rhetoric used in the speech, which was delivered in 1963, was popular with a particular audience.

Example: You are Rajendra Kumar, a social worker. You read an article in The Hindu on ‘Health Care for Indian Workers’. Write a speech in 125-150 words on the importance of health care to be delivered at a public function to create awareness among the workers. (Delhi 2014)

Unfortunately, the health care options accessible to Indian workers are by far the worst, despite the fact that they make up the majority of the population.

Good morning to all! As a social worker, Rajendra Kumar, I’ve come before you all to discuss the value of health care for Indian employees.

I firmly believe that there is a noticeable lack of a comprehensive and long-term plan that meets the health care demands of Indian employees. Despite India’s significant economic progress, its advantages have not been shared equally, and there are still significant gaps in the workers’ health care in our nation. It is necessary to address the disparities in health care access between demographic groups within the population. It is a known truth that a sizable portion of our workforce is prevented from not only rising over the poverty line but is also lowering a large portion of their lot below the line due to out-of-pocket medical expenses brought on by a lack of access to quality public health care.

The general public must now exert pressure on our various political representatives and hold them responsible in order to ensure that they prioritise improving the health care provided to Indian workers.

Thank you!

 

Speech Writing Examples 1: Inspirational Speech

“Good morning, everyone! Today, I stand before you to share a simple message: Believe in yourself. We all face challenges and setbacks in life, but it’s how we respond to them that defines us. Remember, you have the power to overcome any obstacle.

Think about the great minds of history, like Thomas Edison, who failed countless times before inventing the light bulb. Or Rosa Parks, whose refusal to give up her seat sparked a revolution. These individuals believed in their abilities and refused to let failure hold them back.

So, I urge you to embrace your unique talents and dreams. Don’t let fear or self-doubt overshadow your potential. Surround yourself with positive influences, set clear goals, and work relentlessly toward them.

Remember, success is not always measured by the end result but by the journey. Embrace failures as opportunities for growth and learning. Believe in yourself, and others will believe in you too.

As we go forth from this gathering, let us carry the torch of self-belief, inspiring others along the way. Together, we can achieve greatness and make a difference in the world.

Thank you.”

Speech Writing Example 2: Commencement Address

“Graduates, faculty, honored guests, and fellow students, congratulations on reaching this significant milestone. Today, we stand at the threshold of a new chapter in our lives, filled with possibilities and endless opportunities.

As we reflect on the past years, we realize the importance of perseverance and determination. We have faced numerous challenges, both academically and personally, but we have overcome them, emerging stronger and wiser.

Now, as we embark on this new journey, let us remember the values instilled in us by our institution. Let integrity guide our actions, compassion drive our interactions, and curiosity fuel our quest for knowledge.

We are the architects of our future, and it is our responsibility to make a positive impact on the world. Let us use our education and skills to address the pressing issues of our time, be it climate change, social inequality, or technological advancements.

Graduates, believe in yourselves and your abilities. Trust that you have been equipped with the tools necessary to navigate the challenges that lie ahead. Embrace the unknown, take risks, and never stop learning.

In conclusion, as we step into the world, let us carry the lessons learned and memories cherished. Let us make a difference, not just for ourselves but for the betterment of society.

Congratulations, Class of [year]. Our future awaits us!”

Speech Writing Example 3: Persuasive Speech

“Ladies and gentlemen, today I stand before you to discuss an issue that demands our attention: the importance of recycling. As our planet faces environmental challenges, it is our duty to take action and preserve the Earth for future generations.

By recycling, we can significantly reduce waste and conserve valuable resources. It’s a simple act that has far-reaching impacts. Recycling paper, plastic, glass, and metal can save energy, reduce pollution, and slow down the depletion of natural resources.

Moreover, recycling helps combat climate change. The production of new materials releases greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. By recycling, we can decrease the demand for new production, thereby reducing carbon emissions.

But recycling is not just an individual responsibility; it’s a collective effort. Governments, businesses, and communities must work together to establish effective recycling programs, improve infrastructure, and raise awareness.

I urge you all to incorporate recycling into your daily lives. Encourage your friends, family, and colleagues to do the same. Educate yourselves about proper recycling practices and advocate for stronger environmental policies.

Remember, our actions today will shape the world we pass on to future generations. Let us choose a path of sustainability, where recycling becomes a way of life.

Thank you for your attention and let us commit to making a difference.”

Speech Writing Example 4: Informative Speech

“Ladies and gentlemen, today I want to shed light on an issue that affects millions of people around the world: mental health. Mental health is a vital aspect of our well-being, yet it is often overlooked or stigmatized.

Statistics show that one in four individuals will experience a mental health disorder at some point in their lives. It’s time we break the silence and create a society that fosters understanding and support.

Mental health conditions are not a sign of weakness; they are illnesses that require care and treatment. It is crucial to recognize the signs and symptoms and seek help when needed. Let us erase the misconception that seeking support is a sign of failure.

In addition, we must strive to create an inclusive environment that promotes mental well-being. Education and awareness are key to dismantling the stigma surrounding mental health. Let’s engage in open conversations, provide resources, and offer support to those in need.

Furthermore, we must advocate for accessible and affordable mental health services. Governments and healthcare systems must prioritize mental health funding, ensuring that individuals can access the care they deserve.

Remember, mental health is just as important as physical health. Let us stand together, break the barriers, and create a society that supports and empowers those facing mental health challenges.

Thank you.”

Speech Writing Example 5: Motivational Speech for a Team

“Team, I stand before you today to acknowledge the remarkable journey we have embarked on together. As a collective, we have achieved great feats, faced challenges head-on, and grown stronger with each step.

In this dynamic and competitive world, success lies in our ability to work as a cohesive unit, leveraging each other’s strengths. We are a team that embodies collaboration, trust, and a relentless pursuit of excellence.

Let us remember that greatness is not achieved by individual triumphs alone but by our collective efforts. Together, we have created a culture that fosters innovation, embraces diversity, and encourages personal and professional growth.

But our journey does not end here; it is merely a milestone in the greater pursuit of our goals. Let us set even higher benchmarks, challenge ourselves to reach new heights, and inspire each other to excel.

In times of adversity, let us rally together, supporting and uplifting one another. Remember, it is during the most challenging moments that our true character shines through. Embrace these challenges as opportunities for growth and innovation.

As we move forward, let us hold on to the passion that drives us, the camaraderie that unites us, and the unwavering belief in our collective potential. Together, there is no limit to what we can achieve.

Thank you for being part of this incredible team. Let us continue our journey with enthusiasm and determination.”

Please note that the word counts provided for each example are approximate and may vary slightly depending on formatting and specific word choices.

Speech Writing Process

Writing a good speech is an art. However, with constant practice and the right approach, one can write a good speech. We can write a good speech by using the following steps.

Select a goal and a topic: What topics would you like to discuss and why? Your goal should be to inform, entertain, or persuade your audience, and your topic should be something you are interested in and knowledgeable about.

Examine your target audience: You are talking to whom? What requirements and interests do they have? To what extent do they already understand your topic? Adjust your speech to the comprehension and interest level of your audience.

Examine your subject: Collect data from reliable sources to bolster your primary arguments. This could involve doing your own research, speaking with experts, or reading books, articles, and websites.

Construct an outline: This will assist you in structuring your ideas and guarantee that your speech follows a logical flow. Your introduction, key ideas, illustrative examples, and conclusion should all be included in your outline.

Compose the speech: You can start writing your speech once you have an outline. Make sure your wording is precise and succinct, and refrain from employing excessive jargon. Make sure your speech is the right length and flows naturally by practicing giving it out loud.

Edit and revise the speech: After you’ve written a draught of your speech, thoroughly review it and make any required changes. Make careful to proofread for punctuation, grammatical, and spelling mistakes.

Rehearse giving your speech: You will be more at ease and confident when giving your speech the more you rehearse. Practice in front of small group of people, mirror, or friend or family member.

How to write a good speech?

  • Know why you are giving the speech: Before you start writing, you must be aware of why you are doing it. Determine whether the speech needs to be motivational, entertaining, or just informative.
  • Decide who your audience is: The main factor to consider while writing or giving a speech is your audience. You cannot write a strong and suitable speech unless you are aware of your target audience.
  • Set the speech’s duration: Whatever the subject, make sure to keep it concise and direct. A speech will become repetitive and uninteresting if it is longer than it has to be.
  • Reviewing and practising the speech is important since you might have missed a few small flaws when you first wrote it. Until you are certain that you have it right, edit and revise. Make as much practise as necessary to avoid stammering in front of your audience.
  • Mention your main points after the speech: The key themes that have received a lot of attention and have the potential to change are called takeaways. Always leave your listeners with a concept or idea to consider when you finish speaking.

 

Speech Topics for Class 11

Some speech writing topics 11, and 12 are given here:

 

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FAQs

What is speech writing?

Speech writing involves using appropriate punctuation and expression to convey a thought or message to the reader. Similar to other forms of narrative writing, speech writing. However, there are a few key punctuation and writing structure strategies that students should be aware of.

What is the importance of speech writing?

Writing down a speech is essential since it allows you to better understand the subject, organize your ideas, avoid mistakes in your speech, become more comfortable with it, and raise the overall caliber of the speech.

How do you write up a speech?

Know why you are giving the speech: Before you start writing, you must be aware of why you are doing it. Determine whether the speech needs to be motivational, entertaining, or just informative.
Decide who your audience is: The main factor to consider while writing or giving a speech is your audience. You cannot write a strong and suitable speech unless you are aware of your target audience.
Set the speech's duration: Whatever the subject, make sure to keep it concise and direct. A speech will become repetitive and uninteresting if it is longer than it has to be.
Reviewing and practising the speech is important since you might have missed a few small flaws when you first wrote it. Until you are certain that you have it right, edit and revise. Make as much practise as necessary to avoid stammering in front of your audience.
Mention your main points after the speech: The key themes that have received a lot of attention and have the potential to change are called takeaways. Always leave your listeners with a concept or idea to consider when you finish speaking.

How do I start writing a speech?

Start off by making a statement about the room or a tale, quotation, fact, or joke. It shouldn't go past three or four lines. (For instance, "Mahatma Gandhi once stated..." or "This subject makes me think of a certain occurrence or tale...")

What is basic speech?

Introduction, body, and conclusion are the three fundamental components of speeches and presentations.

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