English Quiz For IBPS and HCA Clerk Prelims [26th November 2021]_00.1
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ഇംഗ്ലീഷ് ക്വിസ് (English Quiz For IBPS and HCA Clerk Prelims [26th November 2021]

IBPS ക്ലർക്ക് പ്രിലിമിനറി, HCA എന്നിവയ്ക്കുള്ള ഇംഗ്ലീഷ് ക്വിസ്(English Quiz For IBPS Clerk Prelims & HCA). ഇംഗ്ലീഷ് ക്വിസ് എല്ലാ മത്സര പരീക്ഷകൾക്കും ചോദിക്കുന്നതാണ്. LDC, LGS, SECRETARIAT ASSISTANT,HIGH COURT ASSISTANT, KTET, FOREST GUARD, KERALA POLICE, IBPS, SSC, RRB, IBPS RRB, IB ACIO, BIS, 10 -)o തലം, 12-)o തലം , ഡിഗ്രിതലത്തിലുള്ള ഇതര KPSC പരീക്ഷകൾ, മറ്റ് മത്സരപരീക്ഷകൾ എന്നിവയ്ക്കുള്ള ഇംഗ്ലീഷ് ക്വിസ്  ചോദ്യങ്ങളും ഉത്തരങ്ങളും.

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ഒക്ടോബർ 2021 മാസപ്പതിപ്പ് | സമകാലിക വിവരങ്ങൾ

October 2021

English Quiz Questions (ചോദ്യങ്ങൾ)

Directions (1-10): In the passage given below there are blanks which are numbered from 1 to 10. They are to be filled with the options given below the passage against each of the respective numbers. Find out the appropriate word in each case which can most suitably complete the sentence without altering its meaning.

 

Q1. It is no surprise that the International Energy Agency found that India’s carbon emissions grew by 4.8% during 2018, in spite of the national ——–1——– on climate change in energy policy. There is wide recognition of the fact that Indians are not historically responsible for the problem, and it is the rich nations led by the U.S. that have ——–2——– in the stock of carbon dioxide linked to extreme climate impacts being witnessed around the globe. As the IEA points out, India’s emissions have grown, but per capita remains less than 40% of the global average. Equity among nations is therefore at the centre of the discussion on energy emissions, and the principle of common but ——–3———- responsibilities is central to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Reassuring as this may be, the universal challenge of climate change has grown to such ———4——– that urgent action to sharply cut carbon emissions is crucial, and all countries, including India, must act quickly. Intensive measures in key sectors — scaling up renewables to raise their share in the energy mix, greening transport, updating building codes and ——5—— energy efficiency — will help meet the national pledge under the Paris Agreement to cut energy intensity of GDP by 33-35% by 2030, over 2005 levels.

 

At the global level, renewable sources of energy grew by 7% during 2018, but that pace is ——-6—— insufficient, considering the rise in demand. Moreover, it was China and Europe that contributed the bulk of those savings, in large measure from solar and wind power, indicating that India needs to ramp up its capacity in this area. In fact, as the founder of the International Solar Alliance, India should ——-7—— the renewables effort. Yet, in spite of falling prices and rising efficiency, the potential of rooftop solar photovoltaics remains poorly utilised. It is time State power utilities are made responsible for defined rates of growth in the ——–8——– of rooftop systems. A second priority area is the cleaning up of coal power plants, some of which are young and have decades of use ahead. This process should be aided by the UNFCCC, which can help transfer the best technologies for carbon capture, use and storage, and provide financial linkage from the $100 billion annual climate fund proposed for 2020. India’s record in promoting green transport has been uninspiring, and ———-9——— from fossil fuels and the resulting pollution are rising rapidly. The Centre’s plan to expand electric mobility through financial incentives for buses, taxis and two-wheelers needs to be pursued vigorously, especially in the large cities. Inevitably, India will have to raise its ambition on emissions reduction, and participate in the global stocktaking of country-level action in 2023. It has the rare opportunity to choose green growth, ——–10——– fossil fuels for future energy pathways and infrastructure.

(a) focused

(b) focus

(c) intentions

(d) goals

(e) None of the above

Read more: English Quiz on 23rd November 2021

 

Q2. It is no surprise that the International Energy Agency found that India’s carbon emissions grew by 4.8% during 2018, in spite of the national ——–1——– on climate change in energy policy. There is wide recognition of the fact that Indians are not historically responsible for the problem, and it is the rich nations led by the U.S. that have ——–2——– in the stock of carbon dioxide linked to extreme climate impacts being witnessed around the globe. As the IEA points out, India’s emissions have grown, but per capita remains less than 40% of the global average. Equity among nations is therefore at the centre of the discussion on energy emissions, and the principle of common but ——–3———- responsibilities is central to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Reassuring as this may be, the universal challenge of climate change has grown to such ———4——– that urgent action to sharply cut carbon emissions is crucial, and all countries, including India, must act quickly. Intensive measures in key sectors — scaling up renewables to raise their share in the energy mix, greening transport, updating building codes and ——5—— energy efficiency — will help meet the national pledge under the Paris Agreement to cut energy intensity of GDP by 33-35% by 2030, over 2005 levels.

 

At the global level, renewable sources of energy grew by 7% during 2018, but that pace is ——-6—— insufficient, considering the rise in demand. Moreover, it was China and Europe that contributed the bulk of those savings, in large measure from solar and wind power, indicating that India needs to ramp up its capacity in this area. In fact, as the founder of the International Solar Alliance, India should ——-7—— the renewables effort. Yet, in spite of falling prices and rising efficiency, the potential of rooftop solar photovoltaics remains poorly utilised. It is time State power utilities are made responsible for defined rates of growth in the ——–8——– of rooftop systems. A second priority area is the cleaning up of coal power plants, some of which are young and have decades of use ahead. This process should be aided by the UNFCCC, which can help transfer the best technologies for carbon capture, use and storage, and provide financial linkage from the $100 billion annual climate fund proposed for 2020. India’s record in promoting green transport has been uninspiring, and ———-9——— from fossil fuels and the resulting pollution are rising rapidly. The Centre’s plan to expand electric mobility through financial incentives for buses, taxis and two-wheelers needs to be pursued vigorously, especially in the large cities. Inevitably, India will have to raise its ambition on emissions reduction, and participate in the global stocktaking of country-level action in 2023. It has the rare opportunity to choose green growth, ——–10——– fossil fuels for future energy pathways and infrastructure.

(a) pumped

(b) boosting

(c) pumps

(d) rise

(e) None of the above

Read more: English Quiz on 11th November 2021

 

Q3. It is no surprise that the International Energy Agency found that India’s carbon emissions grew by 4.8% during 2018, in spite of the national ——–1——– on climate change in energy policy. There is wide recognition of the fact that Indians are not historically responsible for the problem, and it is the rich nations led by the U.S. that have ——–2——– in the stock of carbon dioxide linked to extreme climate impacts being witnessed around the globe. As the IEA points out, India’s emissions have grown, but per capita remains less than 40% of the global average. Equity among nations is therefore at the centre of the discussion on energy emissions, and the principle of common but ——–3———- responsibilities is central to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Reassuring as this may be, the universal challenge of climate change has grown to such ———4——– that urgent action to sharply cut carbon emissions is crucial, and all countries, including India, must act quickly. Intensive measures in key sectors — scaling up renewables to raise their share in the energy mix, greening transport, updating building codes and ——5—— energy efficiency — will help meet the national pledge under the Paris Agreement to cut energy intensity of GDP by 33-35% by 2030, over 2005 levels.

 

At the global level, renewable sources of energy grew by 7% during 2018, but that pace is ——-6—— insufficient, considering the rise in demand. Moreover, it was China and Europe that contributed the bulk of those savings, in large measure from solar and wind power, indicating that India needs to ramp up its capacity in this area. In fact, as the founder of the International Solar Alliance, India should ——-7—— the renewables effort. Yet, in spite of falling prices and rising efficiency, the potential of rooftop solar photovoltaics remains poorly utilised. It is time State power utilities are made responsible for defined rates of growth in the ——–8——– of rooftop systems. A second priority area is the cleaning up of coal power plants, some of which are young and have decades of use ahead. This process should be aided by the UNFCCC, which can help transfer the best technologies for carbon capture, use and storage, and provide financial linkage from the $100 billion annual climate fund proposed for 2020. India’s record in promoting green transport has been uninspiring, and ———-9——— from fossil fuels and the resulting pollution are rising rapidly. The Centre’s plan to expand electric mobility through financial incentives for buses, taxis and two-wheelers needs to be pursued vigorously, especially in the large cities. Inevitably, India will have to raise its ambition on emissions reduction, and participate in the global stocktaking of country-level action in 2023. It has the rare opportunity to choose green growth, ——–10——– fossil fuels for future energy pathways and infrastructure.

(a) differences

(b) differentiation

(c) integration

(d) differentiated

(e) None of the above

Read more: English Quiz on 10th November 2021

 

Q4. It is no surprise that the International Energy Agency found that India’s carbon emissions grew by 4.8% during 2018, in spite of the national ——–1——– on climate change in energy policy. There is wide recognition of the fact that Indians are not historically responsible for the problem, and it is the rich nations led by the U.S. that have ——–2——– in the stock of carbon dioxide linked to extreme climate impacts being witnessed around the globe. As the IEA points out, India’s emissions have grown, but per capita remains less than 40% of the global average. Equity among nations is therefore at the centre of the discussion on energy emissions, and the principle of common but ——–3———- responsibilities is central to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Reassuring as this may be, the universal challenge of climate change has grown to such ———4——– that urgent action to sharply cut carbon emissions is crucial, and all countries, including India, must act quickly. Intensive measures in key sectors — scaling up renewables to raise their share in the energy mix, greening transport, updating building codes and ——5—— energy efficiency — will help meet the national pledge under the Paris Agreement to cut energy intensity of GDP by 33-35% by 2030, over 2005 levels.

 

At the global level, renewable sources of energy grew by 7% during 2018, but that pace is ——-6—— insufficient, considering the rise in demand. Moreover, it was China and Europe that contributed the bulk of those savings, in large measure from solar and wind power, indicating that India needs to ramp up its capacity in this area. In fact, as the founder of the International Solar Alliance, India should ——-7—— the renewables effort. Yet, in spite of falling prices and rising efficiency, the potential of rooftop solar photovoltaics remains poorly utilised. It is time State power utilities are made responsible for defined rates of growth in the ——–8——– of rooftop systems. A second priority area is the cleaning up of coal power plants, some of which are young and have decades of use ahead. This process should be aided by the UNFCCC, which can help transfer the best technologies for carbon capture, use and storage, and provide financial linkage from the $100 billion annual climate fund proposed for 2020. India’s record in promoting green transport has been uninspiring, and ———-9——— from fossil fuels and the resulting pollution are rising rapidly. The Centre’s plan to expand electric mobility through financial incentives for buses, taxis and two-wheelers needs to be pursued vigorously, especially in the large cities. Inevitably, India will have to raise its ambition on emissions reduction, and participate in the global stocktaking of country-level action in 2023. It has the rare opportunity to choose green growth, ——–10——– fossil fuels for future energy pathways and infrastructure.

(a) assuring

(b) proportions

(c) proportional

(d) measuring

(e) None of the above

 

Q5.  It is no surprise that the International Energy Agency found that India’s carbon emissions grew by 4.8% during 2018, in spite of the national ——–1——– on climate change in energy policy. There is wide recognition of the fact that Indians are not historically responsible for the problem, and it is the rich nations led by the U.S. that have ——–2——– in the stock of carbon dioxide linked to extreme climate impacts being witnessed around the globe. As the IEA points out, India’s emissions have grown, but per capita remains less than 40% of the global average. Equity among nations is therefore at the centre of the discussion on energy emissions, and the principle of common but ——–3———- responsibilities is central to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Reassuring as this may be, the universal challenge of climate change has grown to such ———4——– that urgent action to sharply cut carbon emissions is crucial, and all countries, including India, must act quickly. Intensive measures in key sectors — scaling up renewables to raise their share in the energy mix, greening transport, updating building codes and ——5—— energy efficiency — will help meet the national pledge under the Paris Agreement to cut energy intensity of GDP by 33-35% by 2030, over 2005 levels.

 

At the global level, renewable sources of energy grew by 7% during 2018, but that pace is ——-6—— insufficient, considering the rise in demand. Moreover, it was China and Europe that contributed the bulk of those savings, in large measure from solar and wind power, indicating that India needs to ramp up its capacity in this area. In fact, as the founder of the International Solar Alliance, India should ——-7—— the renewables effort. Yet, in spite of falling prices and rising efficiency, the potential of rooftop solar photovoltaics remains poorly utilised. It is time State power utilities are made responsible for defined rates of growth in the ——–8——– of rooftop systems. A second priority area is the cleaning up of coal power plants, some of which are young and have decades of use ahead. This process should be aided by the UNFCCC, which can help transfer the best technologies for carbon capture, use and storage, and provide financial linkage from the $100 billion annual climate fund proposed for 2020. India’s record in promoting green transport has been uninspiring, and ———-9——— from fossil fuels and the resulting pollution are rising rapidly. The Centre’s plan to expand electric mobility through financial incentives for buses, taxis and two-wheelers needs to be pursued vigorously, especially in the large cities. Inevitably, India will have to raise its ambition on emissions reduction, and participate in the global stocktaking of country-level action in 2023. It has the rare opportunity to choose green growth, ——–10——– fossil fuels for future energy pathways and infrastructure.

(a) risen

(b) growth

(c) raising

(d) raised

(e) None of the above

 

Q6. It is no surprise that the International Energy Agency found that India’s carbon emissions grew by 4.8% during 2018, in spite of the national ——–1——– on climate change in energy policy. There is wide recognition of the fact that Indians are not historically responsible for the problem, and it is the rich nations led by the U.S. that have ——–2——– in the stock of carbon dioxide linked to extreme climate impacts being witnessed around the globe. As the IEA points out, India’s emissions have grown, but per capita remains less than 40% of the global average. Equity among nations is therefore at the centre of the discussion on energy emissions, and the principle of common but ——–3———- responsibilities is central to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Reassuring as this may be, the universal challenge of climate change has grown to such ———4——– that urgent action to sharply cut carbon emissions is crucial, and all countries, including India, must act quickly. Intensive measures in key sectors — scaling up renewables to raise their share in the energy mix, greening transport, updating building codes and ——5—— energy efficiency — will help meet the national pledge under the Paris Agreement to cut energy intensity of GDP by 33-35% by 2030, over 2005 levels.

 

At the global level, renewable sources of energy grew by 7% during 2018, but that pace is ——-6—— insufficient, considering the rise in demand. Moreover, it was China and Europe that contributed the bulk of those savings, in large measure from solar and wind power, indicating that India needs to ramp up its capacity in this area. In fact, as the founder of the International Solar Alliance, India should ——-7—— the renewables effort. Yet, in spite of falling prices and rising efficiency, the potential of rooftop solar photovoltaics remains poorly utilised. It is time State power utilities are made responsible for defined rates of growth in the ——–8——– of rooftop systems. A second priority area is the cleaning up of coal power plants, some of which are young and have decades of use ahead. This process should be aided by the UNFCCC, which can help transfer the best technologies for carbon capture, use and storage, and provide financial linkage from the $100 billion annual climate fund proposed for 2020. India’s record in promoting green transport has been uninspiring, and ———-9——— from fossil fuels and the resulting pollution are rising rapidly. The Centre’s plan to expand electric mobility through financial incentives for buses, taxis and two-wheelers needs to be pursued vigorously, especially in the large cities. Inevitably, India will have to raise its ambition on emissions reduction, and participate in the global stocktaking of country-level action in 2023. It has the rare opportunity to choose green growth, ——–10——– fossil fuels for future energy pathways and infrastructure.

(a) gross

(b) grossly

(c) fragile

(d) meagre

(e) None of the above

 

Q7.  It is no surprise that the International Energy Agency found that India’s carbon emissions grew by 4.8% during 2018, in spite of the national ——–1——– on climate change in energy policy. There is wide recognition of the fact that Indians are not historically responsible for the problem, and it is the rich nations led by the U.S. that have ——–2——– in the stock of carbon dioxide linked to extreme climate impacts being witnessed around the globe. As the IEA points out, India’s emissions have grown, but per capita remains less than 40% of the global average. Equity among nations is therefore at the centre of the discussion on energy emissions, and the principle of common but ——–3———- responsibilities is central to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Reassuring as this may be, the universal challenge of climate change has grown to such ———4——– that urgent action to sharply cut carbon emissions is crucial, and all countries, including India, must act quickly. Intensive measures in key sectors — scaling up renewables to raise their share in the energy mix, greening transport, updating building codes and ——5—— energy efficiency — will help meet the national pledge under the Paris Agreement to cut energy intensity of GDP by 33-35% by 2030, over 2005 levels.

 

At the global level, renewable sources of energy grew by 7% during 2018, but that pace is ——-6—— insufficient, considering the rise in demand. Moreover, it was China and Europe that contributed the bulk of those savings, in large measure from solar and wind power, indicating that India needs to ramp up its capacity in this area. In fact, as the founder of the International Solar Alliance, India should ——-7—— the renewables effort. Yet, in spite of falling prices and rising efficiency, the potential of rooftop solar photovoltaics remains poorly utilised. It is time State power utilities are made responsible for defined rates of growth in the ——–8——– of rooftop systems. A second priority area is the cleaning up of coal power plants, some of which are young and have decades of use ahead. This process should be aided by the UNFCCC, which can help transfer the best technologies for carbon capture, use and storage, and provide financial linkage from the $100 billion annual climate fund proposed for 2020. India’s record in promoting green transport has been uninspiring, and ———-9——— from fossil fuels and the resulting pollution are rising rapidly. The Centre’s plan to expand electric mobility through financial incentives for buses, taxis and two-wheelers needs to be pursued vigorously, especially in the large cities. Inevitably, India will have to raise its ambition on emissions reduction, and participate in the global stocktaking of country-level action in 2023. It has the rare opportunity to choose green growth, ——–10——– fossil fuels for future energy pathways and infrastructure.

(a) lead

(b) leading

(c) leads

(d) guiding

(e) None of the above

 

Q8. It is no surprise that the International Energy Agency found that India’s carbon emissions grew by 4.8% during 2018, in spite of the national ——–1——– on climate change in energy policy. There is wide recognition of the fact that Indians are not historically responsible for the problem, and it is the rich nations led by the U.S. that have ——–2——– in the stock of carbon dioxide linked to extreme climate impacts being witnessed around the globe. As the IEA points out, India’s emissions have grown, but per capita remains less than 40% of the global average. Equity among nations is therefore at the centre of the discussion on energy emissions, and the principle of common but ——–3———- responsibilities is central to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Reassuring as this may be, the universal challenge of climate change has grown to such ———4——– that urgent action to sharply cut carbon emissions is crucial, and all countries, including India, must act quickly. Intensive measures in key sectors — scaling up renewables to raise their share in the energy mix, greening transport, updating building codes and ——5—— energy efficiency — will help meet the national pledge under the Paris Agreement to cut energy intensity of GDP by 33-35% by 2030, over 2005 levels.

 

At the global level, renewable sources of energy grew by 7% during 2018, but that pace is ——-6—— insufficient, considering the rise in demand. Moreover, it was China and Europe that contributed the bulk of those savings, in large measure from solar and wind power, indicating that India needs to ramp up its capacity in this area. In fact, as the founder of the International Solar Alliance, India should ——-7—— the renewables effort. Yet, in spite of falling prices and rising efficiency, the potential of rooftop solar photovoltaics remains poorly utilised. It is time State power utilities are made responsible for defined rates of growth in the ——–8——– of rooftop systems. A second priority area is the cleaning up of coal power plants, some of which are young and have decades of use ahead. This process should be aided by the UNFCCC, which can help transfer the best technologies for carbon capture, use and storage, and provide financial linkage from the $100 billion annual climate fund proposed for 2020. India’s record in promoting green transport has been uninspiring, and ———-9——— from fossil fuels and the resulting pollution are rising rapidly. The Centre’s plan to expand electric mobility through financial incentives for buses, taxis and two-wheelers needs to be pursued vigorously, especially in the large cities. Inevitably, India will have to raise its ambition on emissions reduction, and participate in the global stocktaking of country-level action in 2023. It has the rare opportunity to choose green growth, ——–10——– fossil fuels for future energy pathways and infrastructure.

(a) fits

(b) installation

(c) installs

(d) fitting

(e) None of the above

 

Q9. It is no surprise that the International Energy Agency found that India’s carbon emissions grew by 4.8% during 2018, in spite of the national ——–1——– on climate change in energy policy. There is wide recognition of the fact that Indians are not historically responsible for the problem, and it is the rich nations led by the U.S. that have ——–2——– in the stock of carbon dioxide linked to extreme climate impacts being witnessed around the globe. As the IEA points out, India’s emissions have grown, but per capita remains less than 40% of the global average. Equity among nations is therefore at the centre of the discussion on energy emissions, and the principle of common but ——–3———- responsibilities is central to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Reassuring as this may be, the universal challenge of climate change has grown to such ———4——– that urgent action to sharply cut carbon emissions is crucial, and all countries, including India, must act quickly. Intensive measures in key sectors — scaling up renewables to raise their share in the energy mix, greening transport, updating building codes and ——5—— energy efficiency — will help meet the national pledge under the Paris Agreement to cut energy intensity of GDP by 33-35% by 2030, over 2005 levels.

 

At the global level, renewable sources of energy grew by 7% during 2018, but that pace is ——-6—— insufficient, considering the rise in demand. Moreover, it was China and Europe that contributed the bulk of those savings, in large measure from solar and wind power, indicating that India needs to ramp up its capacity in this area. In fact, as the founder of the International Solar Alliance, India should ——-7—— the renewables effort. Yet, in spite of falling prices and rising efficiency, the potential of rooftop solar photovoltaics remains poorly utilised. It is time State power utilities are made responsible for defined rates of growth in the ——–8——– of rooftop systems. A second priority area is the cleaning up of coal power plants, some of which are young and have decades of use ahead. This process should be aided by the UNFCCC, which can help transfer the best technologies for carbon capture, use and storage, and provide financial linkage from the $100 billion annual climate fund proposed for 2020. India’s record in promoting green transport has been uninspiring, and ———-9——— from fossil fuels and the resulting pollution are rising rapidly. The Centre’s plan to expand electric mobility through financial incentives for buses, taxis and two-wheelers needs to be pursued vigorously, especially in the large cities. Inevitably, India will have to raise its ambition on emissions reduction, and participate in the global stocktaking of country-level action in 2023. It has the rare opportunity to choose green growth, ——–10——– fossil fuels for future energy pathways and infrastructure.

(a) emissions

(b) realisation

(c) releases

(d) emission

(e) None of the above

 

Q10. It is no surprise that the International Energy Agency found that India’s carbon emissions grew by 4.8% during 2018, in spite of the national ——–1——– on climate change in energy policy. There is wide recognition of the fact that Indians are not historically responsible for the problem, and it is the rich nations led by the U.S. that have ——–2——– in the stock of carbon dioxide linked to extreme climate impacts being witnessed around the globe. As the IEA points out, India’s emissions have grown, but per capita remains less than 40% of the global average. Equity among nations is therefore at the centre of the discussion on energy emissions, and the principle of common but ——–3———- responsibilities is central to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Reassuring as this may be, the universal challenge of climate change has grown to such ———4——– that urgent action to sharply cut carbon emissions is crucial, and all countries, including India, must act quickly. Intensive measures in key sectors — scaling up renewables to raise their share in the energy mix, greening transport, updating building codes and ——5—— energy efficiency — will help meet the national pledge under the Paris Agreement to cut energy intensity of GDP by 33-35% by 2030, over 2005 levels.

 

At the global level, renewable sources of energy grew by 7% during 2018, but that pace is ——-6—— insufficient, considering the rise in demand. Moreover, it was China and Europe that contributed the bulk of those savings, in large measure from solar and wind power, indicating that India needs to ramp up its capacity in this area. In fact, as the founder of the International Solar Alliance, India should ——-7—— the renewables effort. Yet, in spite of falling prices and rising efficiency, the potential of rooftop solar photovoltaics remains poorly utilised. It is time State power utilities are made responsible for defined rates of growth in the ——–8——– of rooftop systems. A second priority area is the cleaning up of coal power plants, some of which are young and have decades of use ahead. This process should be aided by the UNFCCC, which can help transfer the best technologies for carbon capture, use and storage, and provide financial linkage from the $100 billion annual climate fund proposed for 2020. India’s record in promoting green transport has been uninspiring, and ———-9——— from fossil fuels and the resulting pollution are rising rapidly. The Centre’s plan to expand electric mobility through financial incentives for buses, taxis and two-wheelers needs to be pursued vigorously, especially in the large cities. Inevitably, India will have to raise its ambition on emissions reduction, and participate in the global stocktaking of country-level action in 2023. It has the rare opportunity to choose green growth, ——–10——– fossil fuels for future energy pathways and infrastructure.

(a) stopped

(b) shunned

(c) shun

(d) shunning

(e) None of the above

 

ഒക്‌ടോബർ 2021 മാസപ്പതിപ്പ് | ജയം സമകാലിക ക്വിസ് - പ്രധാനപ്പെട്ട 240 ചോദ്യോത്തരങ്ങൾ

October Month

 

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English Quiz Solutions (ഉത്തരങ്ങൾ)

S1. Ans.(b)

Sol. ‘Focus’ is the correct fit for the blank here.

 

S2. Ans.(a)

Sol. ‘Pumped’ is the correct fit for the blank here.

 

S3. Ans.(d)

Sol. ‘Differentiated’ is the correct fit for the blank here and it means recognize or ascertain what makes (someone or something) different.

 

S4. Ans.(b)

Sol. ‘Proportions’ is the correct fit for the blank here.

 

S5. Ans.(c)

Sol. ‘Raising’ is the correct fit for the blank here.

 

S6. Ans.(b)

Sol. ‘Grossly’ is the correct fit for the blank here and it means in a very obvious and unacceptable manner; flagrantly.

 

S7. Ans.(a)

Sol. ‘Lead’ is the correct fit for the blank here.

 

S8. Ans.(b)

Sol. ‘Installation’ is the correct fit for the blank here.

 

S9. Ans.(a)

Sol. ‘Emissions’ is the correct fit for the blank here.

 

S10. Ans.(d)

Sol. ‘Shunning’ is the correct fit for the blank here and it means persistently avoid, ignore, or reject (someone or something) through antipathy or caution.

 

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ഇത് നിങ്ങൾക്കുള്ള സമയമാണ്. പരീക്ഷയ്ക്ക് സ്വയം തയ്യാറാകാനുള്ള ഏറ്റവും അനുയോജ്യമായ സമയമാണിത്. നിങ്ങൾ വീട്ടിൽ നിന്ന് ഞങ്ങളോടൊപ്പം  പരീക്ഷയ്ക്ക് തയ്യാറാകുക. മികച്ച കോഴ്സുകൾ, മികച്ച ഹെഡ് ട്രെയിനർമാർ, ലളിതമായ നിർദ്ദേശങ്ങൾ, ഗുണനിലവാരമുള്ള ക്വിസ് ചോദ്യങ്ങൾ ഞങ്ങൾ നിങ്ങൾക്ക് നൽകുന്നു. ഈ അത്ഭുതകരമായ സമയം പഠിക്കാൻ നിങ്ങൾക്ക് ബുദ്ധിമുട്ടുള്ള കോഴ്സിന്റെ ഭാഗങ്ങൾ ശക്തിപ്പെടുത്തുക. Mock Tests, Test series , E-Books , Daily Current Affairs, Weekly Current Affairs, Monthly Current Affairs എന്നിവയുടെ സൗജന്യ PDF കൾ അങ്ങനെ നിരവധി പഠന സാമഗ്രികൾ ഇംഗ്ലീഷിലും മലയാളത്തിലും (English & Malayalam) ADDA 247 നിങ്ങൾക്ക് നൽകുന്നു. സൗജന്യവും, പണമടച്ചുള്ളതുമായ ക്ലാസുകൾ ഞങ്ങൾ നിങ്ങൾക്ക് ലാഭകരമായ രീതിയിൽ വാഗ്ദാനം ചെയ്യുന്നു.

*വരാനിരിക്കുന്ന പരീക്ഷകളിൽ വിജയിക്കാൻ ഞങ്ങളോടൊപ്പം ചേരുക*

Use Coupon Code:- KPSC (Double Validity Offer)

മലയാളത്തിലെ  തത്സമയ ക്ലാസുകൾ ഇപ്പോൾ നിങ്ങളുടെ വീട്ടിൽ ലഭ്യമാണ്

English Quiz For IBPS and HCA Clerk Prelims [26th November 2021]_50.1
Kerala PSC Degree Level Batch

തിരഞ്ഞെടുക്കൽ മാത്രമേ പരിശീലനത്തിന് നിങ്ങളെ സഹായിക്കൂ | അഡാ 247-ൽ  മലയാളത്തിൽ പരിശീലനം ആരംഭിക്കുക

Adda247App|

Adda247KeralaPSCyoutube|

Telegram Name:- KPSC Sure Shot Selection

KPSC Exam Online Test Series, Kerala Police and Other State Government Exams

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