Tamil govt jobs   »   Latest Post   »   Top 30 Geography MCQs

Top 30 Geography MCQs for TNPSC,TN TRB,TNUSRB Exams – 22 February 2024

பல்வேறு போட்டித் தேர்வுகளில் புவியியல் முக்கியப் பங்காற்றுகிறது, விண்ணப்பதாரர்களுக்கு அவர்களின் தயாரிப்பில் உதவ, நாங்கள் 30 கேள்விகளை (MCQs)  தொகுத்துள்ளோம். உங்கள் புவியியல் அறிவை மேம்படுத்துவதற்கும், வரவிருக்கும் தேர்வுகளுக்கு உங்களை சிறப்பாக தயார்படுத்துவதற்கும் ஒவ்வொரு கேள்விக்கும் சரியான பதில் உள்ளது.

Top 30 Geography MCQs

Q1. What is called the minimum distance from the Sun in a planet in its orbit?

(a) perihelion

(b) aphelion

(c) Apogee

(d) Perigee

 

Q2. What is Syzygy?

(a) Position of the sun, earth, and moon in the straight line

(b) Earth’s position between Sun and Moon

(c) Sun and Moon positioned on one side of the Earth

(d) The right-angle position of the Moon from the Sun and Earth

 

Q3. Which of the following are smaller planets than the size of the Earth?

(a) Uranus and Mars

(b) Neptune and Venus

(c) Venus and Mars

(d) Neptune and Mars

 

Q4. What is called the maximum distance from the Sun in a planet in its orbit?

(a) Perihelion

(b) Aphelion

(c) Apogee

(d) Perigee

 

Q5. Which of the following is NOT a terrestrial planet?

(a) Mercury

(b) Venus

(c) Mars

(d) Saturn

 

Q6. Which of the following is the largest satellite of the Solar System?

(a) Titan

(b) Miranda

(c) Moon

(d) Ganymede

 

Q7. Equinox means the date when ___________.

(a) duration of day and night are equal

(b) the day is longer than the night

(c) the night is longer than the day

(d) it is the shortest day and the shortest night of the year

 

Q8.  According to the distance of planets from the Sun, which of the following order is correct?

(a) Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars

(b) Mercury, Earth, Mars, Venus

(c) Mercury, Mars, Earth, Venus

(d) Mercury, Mars, Venus, Earth

 

No Source:

Q9. What is the estimated age of the universe?

(a) 2.8 billion years

(b) 13.8 billion years

(c) 28 billion years

(d) 138 billion years

Q10. What is the most common type of galaxy in the universe?

(a) Spiral galaxy

(b) Elliptical galaxy

(c) Irregular galaxy

(d) Lenticular galaxy

 

Q11. The distance between the two latitudes is approximate ___________.

(a) 111 miles

(b) 121 miles

(c) 111 km

(d) 121 km

 

Q12. The Equator does NOT pass through which of the following countries?

(a) Kenya

(b) Mexico

(c) Indonesia

(d) Brazil

 

Q13. Which of the following cities is closest to the Equator?

(a) Colombo

(b) Jakarta

(c) Manila

(d) Singapore

 

Q14. Line of Capricorn does NOT go through which of the following countries?

(a) South Africa

(b) Argentina

(c) Chile

(d) Philippines

 

Q15. How much longitude does the Earth move in an hour?

(a) 12o

(b) 15 o

(c) 18 o

(d) 20 o

 

Q16. Equal day/night in both hemispheres is on ________.

(a) 21st June and 21st March

(b) 5th July and 21st September

(c) 21st March and 23rd September

(d) 5th June and 21st September

 

Q17. 49th Parallel is the boundary line between which two countries?

(a) USA and Canada

(b) North and South Vietnam

(c) Germany and France

(d) Brazil and Chile

Q18. What is the Prime Meridian?

(a) The line of longitude that passes through Greenwich, England

(b) The line of latitude that passes through the equator

(c) The line of longitude that passes through the North Pole

(d) The line of longitude that passes through the South Pole

Q19. What is standard time?

(a) The time in a particular time zone where the sun is directly overhead

(b) The time in a particular time zone where the sun sets

(c) The time in a particular time zone where the sun rises

(d) The time used in a region or country to regulate clocks and timekeeping

Q20. What is the International Date Line?

(a) The line of latitude that divides the Earth into Northern and Southern Hemispheres

(b) The line of longitude that is opposite the Prime Meridian

(c) The line of longitude that is 180 degrees east or west of the Prime Meridian

(d) The line of longitude that is 90 degrees east or west of the Prime Meridian

 

Q21. An earthquake of magnitude _________________ on the Richter scale has a thousand times more destructive energy than an earthquake of magnitude 4.

(a) 5

(b) 7

(c) 6

(d) 8

Q22. Which of the following is NOT an example of a Volcanic Mountain?

(a) Mount Etna

(b) Mount Fujiyama

(c) Mount Black

(d) Mount Kilimanjaro

Q23. The boundaries of the plates of the earth’s crust are the weak zones known as ___________ zones.

(a) cosmic

(b) seismic

(c) formic

(d) anemic

Q24.What type of science is seismology?

(a) Rivers

(b) Earthquake

(c) Mountain

(d) Volcano

Q25. Earthquake tremors are caused by the disturbance deep down inside the uppermost layer of the earth called the _________.

(a) core

(b) kernel

(c) pith

(d) crust

 

Q26. The circular depression containing a volcano’s vent is called a ________.

(a) Crater

(b) Smog

(c) Crust

(d) Delta

 

No Source:

Q27. Which of the following types of seismic waves travel the fastest?

(a) P-waves

(b) S-waves

(c) Surface waves

(d) Love waves

Q28. What is the name of the largest volcanic eruption in recorded history?

(a) Krakatoa

(b) Mount Vesuvius

(c) Mount St. Helens

(d) Tambora

Q29. What is the name of the boundary where two tectonic plates are moving away from each other? (a) Convergent boundary

(b) Divergent boundary

(c) Transform boundary

(d) Subduction zone

Q30. What is the name of the scale used to measure the intensity of an earthquake?

(a) Richter scale

(b) Mercalli scale

(c) Moment magnitude scale

(d) Seismic scale

 

 

 

Solutions: 

 

S1.Ans.(a)

Sol. The perihelion is the point in the orbit of a planet, asteroid, or comet that is nearest to the sun. It is the opposite of the aphelion, which is the point farthest from the sun.

 

S2.Ans.(a)

Sol. The word syzygy is an astronomical term that refers to an alignment in a straight line of three celestial bodies like the sun, moon, and earth bound by gravity.

 

S3.Ans.(c)

Sol. In the Solar system, 3 planets are smaller than Earth. They are Mercury, Mars, and Venus.

 

S4.Ans.(b)

Sol. Aphelion is the point in the orbit where the celestial body is farthest from the Sun.

 

S5.Ans.(d)

Sol. Within the Solar System, the terrestrial planets are the inner planets closest to the Sun, i.e. Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. Saturn is not a terrestrial planet.

 

S6. Ans.(d)

Sol. Ganymede is a satellite of Jupiter and the largest satellite in our solar system. It is larger than Mercury and Pluto and three-quarters the size of Mars.

 

S7.Ans.(a)

Sol. The time or date (twice each year) at which the sun crosses the celestial equator when day and night are of equal length (about 22 September and 20 March)

 

S8.Ans.(a)

Sol. The eight planets that orbit the sun are (in order from the sun): Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Another large body is Pluto, now classified as a dwarf planet or plutoid.

 

S9.Ans.(b)

Sol. The age of the universe is estimated by studying the cosmic microwave background radiation, the rate of expansion of the universe, and the ages of the oldest stars. The current estimate is around 13.8 billion years.

S10.Ans.(b)

Sol. Elliptical galaxies are the most common type of galaxy in the universe. They are characterized by their round or elliptical shape and lack spiral arms. They are often composed of older stars and contain very little gas and dust.

S11.Ans.(c)

Sol. The distance between the two latitudes is approximately 69 miles (111 kilometers). This is because one degree of latitude is approximately equal to 69 miles.

  • Latitudes are imaginary lines that run parallel to the Earth’s equator, which is the line that divides the Earth into the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere. Latitudes are measured in degrees north or south of the equator, with the equator itself being 0 degrees latitude.

 

 

S12. Ans.(b)

Sol. From the given options the Equator passes through Kenya, Indonesia, and Brazil, but it does not pass through Mexico.

  • The equator passes through 13 countries: Ecuador, Colombia, Brazil, Sao Tome & Principe, Gabon, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Kenya, Somalia, Maldives, Indonesia, and Kiribati.
  • Some countries, such as Ecuador and Colombia, are located entirely on the equator, while others, such as Brazil and Indonesia, are only partially located on the equator.

S13. Ans.(d)

Sol. Singapore is the closest to the Equator among the given options. It is located about one degree of latitude (137 kilometres or 85 miles) north of the equator.

  • Along with Hong Kong, South Korea, and Taiwan, Singapore is one of the Four Asian Tigers.

Colombo – the commercial capital and largest city of Sri Lanka.

Manila – the capital and largest city of the Philippines.

Jakarta – the capital and largest city of Indonesia.

S14.Ans.(d)

Sol. The Line of Capricorn does NOT go through the Philippines. The Line of Capricorn is an imaginary line of latitude that circles the Earth at approximately 23.5 degrees south of the equator.

  • It passes through parts of South America, Africa, Australia, and the southern part of the Pacific Ocean, but it does not pass through the Philippines, which is located north of the equator.
  • The Line of Capricorn is an imaginary line of latitude that circles the Earth at approximately 23.5 degrees south of the equator. It is one of the five major circles of latitude that mark maps of the Earth.
  • The Line of Capricorn is located in the southern hemisphere, and it passes through parts of South America, Africa, Australia, and the southern part of the Pacific Ocean.

 

 

S15.Ans.(b)

Sol. The Earth rotates on its axis, completing one full rotation approximately every 24 hours, or one day.

  • In terms of longitude, the Earth moves approximately 15 degrees of longitude for every hour that it rotates since the Earth is divided into 360 degrees of longitude, and it takes 24 hours to complete a full rotation. Therefore, each hour, the Earth moves 15 degrees of longitude, or 1 hour of time zone difference. This is why each time zone is typically defined as a 15-degree difference in longitude from the previous or next time zone.

S16. Ans.(c)

Sol. Equal day/night in both hemispheres, also known as the equinox, occurs on the 21st of March and 23rd of September.

These dates mark the beginning of the astronomical spring and autumn in the respective hemispheres. The word “equinox” is derived from the Latin words “aequus” meaning equal and “nox” meaning night.

  • In contrast, the solstices occur on 21st June and 22nd December, when one hemisphere experiences its longest day of the year and the other hemisphere experiences its shortest day of the year.

S17. Ans.(a)

Sol.  The 49th Parallel is the boundary line between the United States of America and Canada. It is also known as the Canada–United States border or the International Boundary, and it stretches from the Pacific Ocean to the Great Lakes.

  • The USA-Canada border is the longest international border in the world, and it is heavily monitored and patrolled by both countries.

S18.Ans.(a)

Sol. The Prime Meridian is the line of longitude that passes through Greenwich, England, and it is the starting point for measuring longitude. It is an imaginary line of longitude that runs from the North Pole to the South Pole, passing through the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London, England. It is the line of 0 degrees longitude.

The Prime Meridian was established by an international conference in 1884 as the reference line for longitude.

The Standard or Prime meridian of India passes through the city of Mirzapur in Uttar Pradesh.

S19.Ans.(d)

Sol. Standard time is the time used in a region or country to regulate clocks and timekeeping. It is based on the mean solar time at a specific longitude and is usually measured in hours ahead or behind Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).

Standard time is the time system used to divide the world into different time zones based on the Earth’s rotation and the position of the sun. The Earth is divided into 24 longitudinal divisions or time zones, each approximately 15 degrees of longitude wide, with a time difference of one hour between adjacent time zones.

The concept of standard time was first proposed by Sir Sandford Fleming in 1879 and was adopted internationally by the 1920s.

 

S20.Ans.(c)

Sol. The International Date Line is the line of longitude that is 180 degrees east or west of the Prime Meridian. The IDL marks the place where the date changes by one day. When you cross the International Date Line, you move forward or back by one day, depending on the direction of travel.

  • To the east of the IDL, it is one day later than to the west. Therefore, when you cross the IDL from west to east, you will gain one calendar day, and when you cross it from east to west, you will lose one day.
  • The IDL is not a straight line, but it zigzags to avoid splitting up certain countries and territories. For example, it passes between Russia’s Chukotka Peninsula and Alaska’s Aleutian Islands to avoid dividing them, and it also passes east of New Zealand to keep the country in the same calendar day.

S21. Ans.(c)

Sol. An earthquake of magnitude 6 on the Richter scale has a thousand times more destructive energy than an earthquake of magnitude 4.

  • The Richter scale is logarithmic, so each increase of one magnitude represents a tenfold increase in the amplitude of the seismic waves and a thousandfold increase in the amount of energy released.
  • An earthquake is measured with a machine called a seismograph. The magnitude of the earthquake is measured on the Richter scale.

S22.Ans.(c)

Sol. From the given options Mount Black is NOT a Volcanic Mountain. Mount Black is a prominent mountain of Antarctica, 3,005 meters (9,860 ft) high, with a gentle snow-covered slope on its southwest side and a steep rock face on its northwest side, forming a part of the polar escarpment just west of Bennett Platform and the upper reaches of Shackleton Glacier.

  • Mount Etna – example of a Volcanic Mountain. It is an active stratovolcano located on the east coast of the island of Sicily, Italy. Mount Etna is also a UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • Mount Fujiyama – commonly known as Mount Fuji, is an example of a Volcanic Mountain. It is an active stratovolcano located on the Honshu Island of Japan. Mount Fuji is also a UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • Mount Kilimanjaro – a dormant volcano located in the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania. It has three volcanic cones: Kibo, Mawenzi, and Shira. It is the highest mountain in Africa.

S23. Ans.(b)

Sol. A seismic zone is a region in which the rate of seismic activity remains fairly consistent. In this area plates of the earth’s crust are weak.

Seismic zones, also known as fault zones, are regions in the earth’s crust where the tectonic plates meet and interact. These zones are characterized by frequent earthquake activity as the plates move and grind against each other.

  • The movement of the plates generates enormous amounts of energy that is released as seismic waves, causing earthquakes.
  • Seismic zones are also areas where volcanoes are commonly found as the movements of the plates can lead to the formation of magma chambers and volcanic eruptions.

S24. Ans.(b)

Sol. Seismology is the scientific study of earthquakes and the propagation of elastic waves through the Earth or through other planet-like bodies.

Seismologists use seismometers and other instruments to measure and record seismic waves, which can provide information about the Earth’s internal structure and dynamics, as well as the location and characteristics of earthquakes.

  • Rivers are a part of the science of hydrology, which is the study of water in the Earth’s system. Hydrologists study the movement, distribution, and quality of water on Earth, including rivers, streams, lakes, and groundwater.
  • The study of mountains is a part of geology, which is the study of the Earth’s physical structure, properties, and processes. Geologists who specialize in studying mountains are called geomorphologists.
  • Volcanology is the study of volcanoes and volcanic phenomena, such as lava flows, eruptions, and volcanic gases. Volcanologists use a range of techniques to monitor and study volcanoes, including seismic monitoring, gas measurements, and field observations.

S25. Ans.(d)

Sol. Earthquake tremors are caused by the disturbance deep down inside the uppermost layer of the earth called the crust.

The crust is a relatively thin layer of solid rock that forms the outer shell of the Earth, and it is broken into several large tectonic plates that move and interact with each other. When two plates move against each other, pressure builds up and causes rocks to deform and break, resulting in an earthquake.

  • The core is the central region of the Earth, located beneath the mantle. It is composed of two layers, an inner core of solid iron and nickel, and an outer core of liquid metal.
  • “Kernel” is not a commonly used term in geology or Earth science, and it does not refer to any specific layer or structure within the Earth.
  • “Pith” is a term used in botany to refer to the spongy tissue in the center of a plant stem.

S26. Ans.(a)

Sol. The circular depression containing a volcano’s vent is called a crater. It is formed during an eruption when magma, ash, and other volcanic materials are ejected from the volcano and create a bowl-shaped depression around the vent.

  • The size and shape of a volcano’s crater can vary depending on the type of eruption, the size of the volcano, and other factors. In some cases, the crater can be several kilometers in diameter and hundreds of meters deep.

S27.Ans.(a)

Sol. P-waves, also known as primary waves or compressional waves, are the fastest type of seismic waves and can travel through solid and liquid materials. They cause particles in the rock to move back and forth in the direction that the wave is traveling.

wave Name Motion Speed Ability to travel through
Body wave P-wave Compressional Fastest Solid and liquid materials
Body wave S-wave Shear Slower than P-waves Solid materials only
Surface wave Love wave Horizontal Slower than P-waves and S-waves, but faster than Rayleigh waves Near the Earth’s surface
Surface wave Rayleigh wave Rolling Slowest Near the Earth’s surface

 

Note: P-waves and S-waves are both types of body waves, which means that they travel through the Earth’s interior. Love waves and Rayleigh waves are both types of surface waves, which means that they travel along the Earth’s surface.

S28.Ans.(d)

Sol. The eruption of Tambora, a volcano located in Indonesia, in 1815 is considered the largest volcanic eruption in recorded history. The eruption had a global impact, causing significant cooling of the Earth’s climate and leading to widespread crop failures and famine in many parts of the world.

The volcanic ash from the eruption also caused global sunsets to appear more colorful and vibrant than usual, leading to a phenomenon known as “Tambora sunsets”.

Volcano Location Notable Eruption Effects
Krakatoa Indonesia 1883 Generated massive tsunamis that killed tens of thousands of people, significant cooling of the Earth’s climate
Mount Vesuvius Italy 79 AD Buried the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum under layers of ash and pumice, estimated to have killed thousands of people
Mount St. Helens United States 1980 Devastated an area of over 500 square kilometers around the volcano, caused a large ash cloud that disrupted air traffic
Tambora Indonesia 1815 Largest volcanic eruption in recorded history, caused significant cooling of the Earth’s climate and led to crop failures and famine, caused “Tambora sunsets”

 

S29.Ans.(b)

Sol. A divergent boundary is a type of tectonic plate boundary where two plates are moving away from each other. This process can create a new oceanic crust and can also result in volcanic activity, as magma rises up to fill the gap created by the separating plates.

Divergent boundaries are commonly found along mid-ocean ridges, where new crust is being formed. Examples of divergent boundaries include the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the East African Rift.

Type of Boundary Description Examples of Features Examples of Locations
Convergent Two plates moving towards each other Mountain ranges, subduction zones, volcanic activity Andes Mountains, Himalayas, Pacific Ring of Fire
Divergent Two plates moving away from each other Mid-ocean ridges, volcanic activity Mid-Atlantic Ridge, East African Rift
Transform Two plates sliding past each other horizontally Earthquakes San Andreas Fault
Subduction One plate with oceanic crust forced underneath another plate with continental crust Deep-sea trenches, volcanic arcs, earthquakes Andes Mountains, Pacific Ring of Fire

 

S30.Ans.(b)

Sol. The Mercalli scale is a measure of earthquake intensity that is based on the amount of shaking and damage caused by the earthquake at a given location. It is a subjective scale that uses a series of Roman numerals to describe the intensity of the earthquake, ranging from I (not felt) to XII (total destruction).

Scale Type Measure Units Developed by
Richter scale Magnitude Amount of energy released by earthquake Logarithmic scale Charles Richter
Mercalli scale Intensity Amount of shaking and damage caused by earthquake Roman numerals Giuseppe Mercalli
Moment magnitude scale Magnitude Amount of energy released by earthquake, size of fault rupture, and amount of displacement Logarithmic scale Thomas C. Hanks and Hiroo Kanamori

 

Note: The term “seismic scale” is a generic term that can refer to any scale used to measure earthquakes. It is not a specific scale like the Richter scale, Mercalli scale, or moment magnitude scale.

 

 

 

****************************************************************************

Tamil Nadu Mega Pack (Validity 12 Months)

 

இது போன்ற தேர்விற்கான தகவல் மற்றும் பாடக்குறிப்புகளை பெற ADDA247 தமிழ் செயலியை பதிவிறக்கம் செய்யுங்கள்
Adda247 TamilNadu Home page Click here
Official Website=Adda247 Click here